The Little Coconut Book by Gene Gonzales

The Little Coconut Book
By Gene Gonzales
A winner of the Manila Critics Circle National Book Award, noted chef Gene Gonzales has compiled
and tested innovative Filipino recipes incorporating coconut in every aspect of cuisine.
Here are the coconut-based Filipino recipes offered in this book:

1. Fish and Seafood such as:
Embutidong Pusit
Sinaing na Tulingan
Buko Hipon
Pinangat na Alimasag
Kuhol (Escargot)
Bibingka Lamang Dagat
Island Tempura
Pialam na Bariles
Ginataang Alimasag with Langka
Coconut Shrimps with Pinipig-Garlic Topping
Sinugbatgata
Tinuktok
Singkil
Gene’s Tropical Chowder

2. Poultry

Chicken Coconut Croquetas
Chicken Tidbits in Coconut Glaze with Garlic & Peanuts

3. Meat

Binagoongang Baboy sa Gata
Ginataang Chicken-Pork Adobo
Dinuguan

4. Veggies/Accompaniments

Minanga
Bagoong Guisado with Santan
Ginataang Mungo
Laing
Binayabas
Talongsa Habagat
Lumpiang Buko
Atsarang Ubod ng Niyog

5. Rice & Noodles

Pancit Laing
Coconut Fried Rice

6. Dessert

Buko Pie
Puto
Mango Coconut Flan (Panna Cotta)
Sampelot Lamig
Croquetas de Coco
Coco Nigo
Guinomis Barako
Pinasuyo
Pulto Gata
Creamy Coconut Lychee Mousse
Almond Coconut Coffee Trio

This is a paperback book. The book is written entirely in English and uses standard measurements for cooking instructions (cups, teaspoons, etc.)

CHECK OUT THE ADOBO BOOK AND OTHER FILIPINO COOKBOOKS BY CLICKING THE EBAY LOGO BELOW:


My items on eBay

OR JUST CLICK ON MY LINK AT MY
EBAY-APPROVED STORE AT:

http://www.ebenta.us

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

The Adobo Book: Traditional and Jazzed-Up Recipes

The Adobo Book: Traditional and Jazzed-Up Recipes

Plus Essays, Trivia and Cooking Techniques

By Reynaldo Gamboa Alejandro and Nancy Reyes-Lumen

From the Author’s Note:

“We respect the individual styles of the authors of these recipes and decided to keep the grace, practicality, stubborness, romance, uniqueness and tradition of them all by not subjecting these to standardized recipe methods

Somehow adobos lose their magic taste when it’s put in a very correct recipe form. Most of the recipes in these books are “freestyle” and personally owned. The lively texture of the recipes show it.”

And what exactly is Philippine adobo, as opposed to, say, Puerto Rican adobo? According to

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adobo, adobo is basically, Spanish for seasoning or marinade. The noun form

describes the marinade or seasoning mix. Meat marinated or seasoned with an adobo is referred to having been adobada. Adobo relates to marinated dishes such as chipotles en adobo, which are chipotle chili peppers marinated in a rich, flavorful, tomato sauce.

Adobo is prepared in regions of Latin America, Mexico, Peru, Ecuador, Bolivia, Philippines and Spain. Pork, spices, and especially red pepper are used.

Adobo is Spanish for seasoning or marinade. The noun form describes the marinade or seasoning mix. Meat marinated or seasoned with an adobo is referred to having been adobada. Adobo relates to marinated dishes such as chipotles en adobo, which are chipotle chili peppers marinated in a rich, flavorful, tomato sauce.

Adobo is prepared in regions of Latin America, Mexico, Peru, Ecuador, Bolivia, Philippines and Spain. Pork, spices, and especially red pepper are used.

Filipino-style adobo

In Filipino cuisine, adobo refers to a common and very popular cooking process indigenous to the Philippines.

When Spanish colonizers took administration over the Philippines in the late 1500s, they found an indigenous cooking process involving stewing with vinegar. They referred to this as “adobo.” Dishes prepared in this manner eventually came to be known by this name.

Thus, the adobo dish and cooking process in Filipino cuisine and the general description “adobo” in Spanish cuisine share similar characteristics, but in fact refer to different things with different cultural roots. While Philippine adobo can be considered adobo – a marinated dish – in the Spanish sense, the Philippine usage is much more specific. The dish is also strongly associated with large Filipino communities, notably in Hawai’i.

Typically, pork or chicken, or a combination of both, is slowly cooked in soy sauce, vinegar, crushed garlic, bay leaf, and black peppercorns, and often browned in the oven or pan-fried afterward to get the desirable crisped edges. This dish originates from the northern region of the Philippines, where dog was originally a prominent protein source for adobo-style dishes. It is commonly packed for Filipino mountaineers and travelers. Its relatively long shelf-life is due to one of its primary ingredients, vinegar, which inhibits the growth of bacteria.

The standard accompaniment to adobo is white rice or pancit noodles.

Outside the home-cooked dish, the essence of adobo has been developed commercially and adapted to other foods. A number of successful local Philippine snack products usually mark their items “adobo-flavored.” This assortment includes, but is not limited to nuts, chips, noodle soups, and corn crackers.

Here are the contents of this cookbook:

SAVORY ESSAYS ON ADOBO

Almost Famous Adobo by The Adobo Queen

Adobo Forever

An Adobo Chronicle by Felice Prudente Sta. Maria

P.O.W. Adobo of Col. Francisco Naval

Do you remember the Aristocrat Adobo? By NRL

“Resipis” – Excerpts from the Taliba Magazine Recipes

United Colors of Adoboo by NRL

In-Flight Adobo

IT’S IN THE COOKING

10+ Commandments in Cooking Adobo

Mama Sita’s Tried and Tested Formula

Cooking Vignettes

“Yagit” na Adobo

On Adobong Pancit

Notes on Ingredients

C.P.A. Modification Chart by Joey Herrera

PERSONAL STYLES

Adobo by Text

Rodrigo’s Roast: Recipe of Enriqueta David-Perez

Ayi Malay by Bobby Malay Ocampo

A New Jersey USA version

Lydia Diaz Lumen: On my Plate is Chicken Adobo

Dona Mary Ejercito – It’s in the Manner of Serving

Gay Maruyama – Adobo in the Garapon

Mga Kuwento ni Tita Mila (Enriquez)

Joey Reyes Herrera – A “duh” -bo

THE RECIPES

Pork adobo in buco juice

Don Ado’s skinless adobo

Homestyle adobo at the villa

Cerne de Ternera en Adobo

A vegetarian adobo

Amanpulo grills ala Adobo

An ordinary everyday adobo recipe

Paella de Adobo

Grilled chicken adobo with coconut

Sawsawang adobong gata for inihaw na sugpo

Cornish hen adobo

Adobo by intuition

Adobo

Pork adobo classic

Adobong kaluto noong panahon ng Kastila

Quezon Adobo

Ado-badong

Native frog legs cooked in paombong vinegar

Toyo adobo

“Bato-bato”

Chicken and liempo adobo

Toyoba

Adobong manok at baboy

Adobong alimasag

Balut adobo

Adobong sugpo na may luya

Lan-ci

Adobong pugo

Adobo supreme

My mother’s adobo

Pampanga-style adobo

Saucy chicken and pork adobo

Two-way adobo with roasted garlic

The Bicol adobo version

CPA (chicken pork adobo)

American-style adobo

Adobong pato (duck)

Pork pata adobo

Famous chicken adobo

Baked chicken adobo

Adobong talunan

Adobong Mindanao (spicy)

Adobo with sesame oil

Tahong adobo

“Rodrigo’s Roast”

Malolos Adobo

A homesick student’s microwave adobo

Adobo of Mrs. Fay Gamboa Vda de Weber

Pinatisan

Adobong “GG”

Adobong Tsino

Kilain

Sta. Maria Adobo

Quail adobo

Adobo of Daku

Pinaputok na adobong pla-pla

Adobong alamang sa dahon ng gabi

Adobong Bisaya

Family adobo sa manggang hilaw

Normal adobo recipe

Adobo in coconut sauce

Adobon puso ng saging

Adobo with dried lapu-lapu

Adobo sa parika

Legaspi, Albay adobo

A simple sarap adobo

This is a paperback book. The book is written entirely in English and uses standard measurements for cooking instructions (cups, teaspoons, etc.)

CHECK OUT THE ADOBO BOOK AND OTHER FILIPINO COOKBOOKS BY CLICKING THE EBAY LOGO BELOW:


My items on eBay

OR JUST CLICK ON MY LINK AT MY
EBAY-APPROVED STORE AT:

http://www.ebenta.us

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Pulutan Filipino Philippine Tapas Recipes Cookbook

This is a paperback book. The book is written entirely in English and uses standard measurements for cooking instructions (cups, teaspoons, etc.)
Pulutan – From The Soldier’s Kitchen (Paperback – Written in English) by Elmer D. Cruz (Author), Emerson R. Rosales (Author), Ellen T. Tordesillas (Editor), Yvonne T. Chua (Editor)

Pulutan (literally “something that is picked”) or Philippine Tapas is a term roughly analogous to the English term “finger food”. It originally was a snack accompanied with liquor or beer but has found its way into Philippine cuisine as appetizers or, in some cases, main dishes, as in the case of sisig.

Deep fried dishes include chicharon that are pork rinds that have been salted, dried, then fried; chicharong bituka or chibab (pig intestines that have been deep fried to a crisp); chicharong bulaklak or chilak similar to chicharong bituka has a bulaklak or flower appearance of the dish made from mesenteries of pig intestines; chicken skin or chink that has been deep fried until crispy.

Some grilled foods include Barbecue Isaw, chicken or pig intestines marinated and skewered; barbecue tenga pig ears are marinated and skewered; pork barbecue which is a satay marinated in a special blend; Betamax that is salted solidified pork blood which is skewered; Adidas which is grilled or sautéed chicken feet. And there is Sisig a popular pulutan made from the pork’s cheek skin, ears and liver that is initially boiled, then grilled over charcoal, then minced and cooked with chopped onions, chillies, and spices.

Smaller snacks such as mani (peanuts) are often sold boiled in the shell, salted, spiced or flavored with garlic by street vendors in the Philippines. Another snack is Kropeck which is fish crackers.

The fried Tokwa’t Baboy is tofu fried with boiled pork then dipped in a garlic-flavored soy sauce or vinegar dip that is also served as a side dish to pancit luglog or pancit palabok   To read more about Philippine Tapas or “Pulutan” and the history of Tapas in Spain, the Philippines and other countries, just check out this online reference at:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tapas )
“Pulutan – from the Soldier’s Kitchen” is a soldier’s cookbook co-authored by Ensigns Elmer Cruz and Emerson Rosales who are currently under detention for being accused of being part of a coup plot to bring down the administration of current Philippine President, Gloria M. Arroyo. This is the kind of cookbook that can provide cooking secrets that no other traditional cookbook can provide – tasty cooking recipes for finger foods — that is, Philippine Tapas or “Pulutan” that Filipinos love to munch on while consuming beer.

Putting out a cookbook might have been the last thing on their minds if Ensigns Elmer Cruz and Emerson Rosales were still at duty — at sea or a naval facility. But incarceration has a way of drastically altering people’s lives, as the two young Philippine Military Academy graduates (class of 2000) discovered first hand. Cruz and Rosales are among hundreds of soldiers from the Magdalo movement who were thrown in jail for their participation in July 2003 in what now is popularly known as the “Oakwood Mutiny”. The duo have turned to cooking, among other activities, to not just while away the time — and they have a lot that in their hands — but also recreate the flavors they had savored during their childhood, their cadet years, and their stints at sea.

But pulutan? Why not? After all , pulutan has been many a soldier’s trusty buddy (besides beer and spirits, of course) in good and bad times.Pulutan conjures the comraderie that binds many Pinoys, including these idealistic soldiers. And Cruz and Rosales had as yet to see a book devoted to the pulutan they adore. Ensigns Cruz and Rosales and their contributors swear by all the entries in this recipe book. It’s a soldier’s pledge.   Here are the recipes contained in this very unique cookbook:

ALL-TIME FAVORITES
Baked Pork Ribs
Beef Caldereta
Beef Salpicao
Beef Teriyaki
Calderetang Pato
Crispy Pata
Humbalicious
Pata Tim (Glazed Pork Leg)
Patuten/Pato Tim (Humbang Itik)
Pinaupong Manok sa Palayok
Pinoy Siomai
Special Tokwa’t Baboy
Swabeng Spareribs
ATBP.
Beef with Gravy
Pata con Pina
Pinakupsan
Pork Chop with a Twist
Sweet Corn and Mushrooms
Tequila Combo
Turbo Spareribs

FRIED PULUTAN
Calamares a la Trillanes
Chicharon Bulaklak
Crispy Crablets
Fried Tahong
Groggy Chicken
Liver con Bacon
Nilasing na Sugpo
Pork Liver Fries
Spicy Chicken Wings
Sweet and Sour GG Balls
Tanigue Fingers

GOAT’S MEAT
Calderetang Kambing
Kilawing Kambing
Pinapaitang Kambing
Sinampalukang Kambing
INIHAW DELIGHTS
Bloody Belly Grill
Grilled Chicken Adobo
Grilled Pork Ears
Oyster Grill
Sinugba na Saang (Conch)
Spicy Stuffed Squid
Buttered and Steamed Tilapia
KINILAW
Beef Kilaw (Ata-Ata)
Beef Kilaw (Kinigtot)
Jumping Salad
Kilawing Pusit
Kilawing Puso ng Saging
Kilawing Tanigue
Kilawing Tanigue with a Twist
Kinilaw na Saang (Conch)
Kinilaw na Taklobo (Giant Clams)
Kinilaw na Talaba

LAMANG-DAGAT
Adobong Taklobo (Giant Clams)
Anak ng Pugita
Buttered Tahong or Halaan
Gising Gising (Seafod Extreme)
Sauteed Oysters
Shrimps and Hotdog
Sisig Tuna
Steamed Anchovies
Stuffed Oysters
Tahong Especial
LUTO SA GATA

Adobong Hito sa Gata
Adobong Pugo sa Gata
Bicol Express
Bicol Express II
Ginataang Kuhol
Ginataang Octopus
Satti de Zamboanga
Seafood Curry
LASANG EXOTIC
Adobong Dagang Bukid
Balls 2 Men!
Ginataang Pagi
Insectxotic
Kinilaw na Balat (Sea Cucumber)
Kinilaw na Tuyon (Sea Urchin)
Kinilaw na Tamilok (Woodworm)
Paes (Steamed Stingray)
Palakang Bukid

USAPANG LECHON
Lechon Kawali
Lecon Paksiw
Leftover Lechon Fries
Swabeng Lechon Kawali
PULUTANG SABAW
Bulalo
Sinampalukang Manok
Sinigang na Adidas
Soup No. 5
NOT THE USUAL PARTS
Bangus Sarapa
Bopis
Dinakdakan
Dinuguang Manok
French Kiss (Cow Tongue)
Kapalmuks
Kiss my Chicken’s Ass
Paklay
Pinapaitang Baboy
Pinapaitang Baka
Smooch (Ngiwngiw)
Tarlaqueno Sisig
Vampire’s Delight

GLOSSARY OF FILIPINO CULINARY TERMS INTO ENGLISH

CHECK OUT PULUTAN AND OTHER FILIPINO COOKBOOKS BY CLICKING THE EBAY LOGO BELOW:


My items on eBay

OR JUST CLICK ON MY LINK AT MY

EBAY-APPROVED STORE AT:

http://www.ebenta.us

Leave a comment

Filed under Uncategorized

Hello world!

Welcome to WordPress.com. This is your first post. Edit or delete it and start blogging!

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized